Vh1 save the music 2018

Explore Soundfly’s wide array of free online courses and expand your musical skills over your lunch break! Here’s just a few free courses you can choose from: How to Create a Killer Musician Website, Theory for Bedroom Producers, Touring on a Shoestring, and How to Get All the Royalties You Never Knew Existed. Or check out our 4-week coaching program, The Headliners Club, and work with one of our professional Soundfly Mentors to reach your musical goals! 

With overwhelmingly positive results, we’re happy to share a few select testimonials of Soundfly’s Beginner Harmonic Theory course directly from our students.

Read moreVh1 save the music 2018

National endowment for the arts funding

I’d like to see if you have [dates] available for a show I’m putting together. I’ve reached out to [band 1], [band 2], and [band 3] to headline, and I can lock at least one of them down once we have the venue and date confirmed. I’ve included links to all of the artists’ music and their bios below.

To isolate and mix Electronic Drum Kit percussion parts, you’ll need to select kits listed under the Drum Machine section. To isolate and mix organic Drum Kit percussion parts, choose from any of the kits listed under the Producer Kits section. In theory, you could build drum parts individually, one track at a time, using the combined kit instruments, but this method will take far more time and will be much harder to compose intuitively through.

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Pabst blue ribbon

It seems we can always turn to a popular old melody for some familiar sing-along action. The lyrics of this tune have a bit of an icky past, harking back to the American Civil War, but like most public domain songs to stand the test of time, the simplistic melody often reminds us of childhood. In “Shoo Fly, Don’t Bother Me” you’ll find the major third at 0:04, on the lyrics “Shoo” and “fly.”

The very first time I can recall hearing this song on my parents’ turntable, I was struck by that groovy little bass riff between the lyric lines “tell you something” and “I think you’ll understand,” and repeated throughout the verses in the same spot. What makes this little flurry of notes so clever is the sudden change in meter (coming out of the slow, steady rocking on the root and sometimes the fifth) and the double emphasis on the leading tones.

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