Great rap albums 2018

Another extremely common and timeless technique to make your chorus shine is simply cutting the music out completely for half a measure or even an entire measure in some cases. Some of today’s electronic producers also prefer cutting out effects such as reverb and delay, to make that moment of silence even more dramatic, like you’re falling off a tiny cliff. This technique is especially fun to apply in situations where the chorus vocals start with pick-up notes from the previous measure.

Elise Dewsberry’s “Singing Sixty Birthday Recording” campaign lacks a pitch video, but the project is as heart-warming as they come. She does a pretty good job of selling it, too.

Read moreGreat rap albums 2018

Donate musical instruments chicago

All of our mentored online courses come with six weeks of 1-on-1 professional coaching and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! Share your goals with us and we’ll find a course for you, or create a custom mentorship session with a pro musician, engineer, educator, or music industry veteran to help you achieve them. 

The basic awkwardness of harmonics-based tuning systems has caused musicians a lot of confusion and irritation over the years. Depending on your starting pitch, some intervals can be perfectly in tune, but others can’t be. And the more harmonically complex you want your music to be, the worse the tuning issues are going to get.

Read moreDonate musical instruments chicago

Pabst blue ribbon

It seems we can always turn to a popular old melody for some familiar sing-along action. The lyrics of this tune have a bit of an icky past, harking back to the American Civil War, but like most public domain songs to stand the test of time, the simplistic melody often reminds us of childhood. In “Shoo Fly, Don’t Bother Me” you’ll find the major third at 0:04, on the lyrics “Shoo” and “fly.”

The very first time I can recall hearing this song on my parents’ turntable, I was struck by that groovy little bass riff between the lyric lines “tell you something” and “I think you’ll understand,” and repeated throughout the verses in the same spot. What makes this little flurry of notes so clever is the sudden change in meter (coming out of the slow, steady rocking on the root and sometimes the fifth) and the double emphasis on the leading tones.

Read morePabst blue ribbon